Building a Place for History – 2021 Conference Program  

Three Consecutive Thursdays:  June 3, June 10, June 17

Day One – Advocacy and Historic Preservation  

Thursday, June 3, 2021 

You may register for Day One only or all three days. Registration is now open!  

Entertainment during each break will be provided by the Rutgers University Voorhees Choir.  

 

9:00 am to 9:15 am:  

Welcoming Remarks  

by Lt. Governor Sheila Oliver  

 

9:15 am to 10:30 am:  

Keynote Speaker 

Paul Edmondson, President and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation  

 

Paul Edmondson, President of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, will discuss the challenges and opportunities facing the historic preservation movement following a year of change. From historic sites connecting virtually to their communities as a result of the pandemic, to the preservation community’s response to the national reckoning on racial justice, to addressing climate change and other issues of national importance in a discordant political environment, the impacts of the past year will have a permanent – and, in many ways, positive – impact on our work as we face a new, but ever-evolving, normal.

 

10:45 am to 12:00 pm:  

S-1 | Advocacy Issues in Historic Preservation 

Credits/Audience: AICP, HPC 

 

Professionals in the fields of architecture, law, and public policy will discuss advocacy methods, current statewide initiatives, and successful campaigns for overhauls in preservation policy and funding such as the recently passed state historic preservation tax credit. 

 

MODERATOR:  

Dorothy P. Guzzo, Executive Director, New Jersey Historic Trust 

 

PRESENTERS:   

Renee Kuhlman, Senior Director of Outreach and Support, National Trust for Historic Preservation  

Janine Bauer, Partner, Szaferman Lakind 

Michael Hanrahan, AIA, Board Member, Preservation New Jersey  

 

12:00 pm to 1:00 pm: 

Lunch 

 

1:00 pm to 2:15 pm:  

S-2 | Accessibility and Inclusion for Preservation  

Credits/Audience: AIA, NP, AICP  

 

Access and inclusion are no longer buzz words in historic preservation. We are all legally and ethically obligated to not only provide access to people with disabilities to our museums and historic sites, but also to make people with disabilities and the people who are with them feel just as welcome as everyone else. Session attendees will learn basic principles behind accessibility and inclusion, such as how and why to develop and prototype programs in collaboration with people with disabilities and how making history accessible and inclusive should be at the core of what we do to preserve the history of the people, places, and events we care so much about. 

 

MODERATOR: 

Nicole Belolan, PhD, Rutgers-Camden and National Council on Public History  

 

PRESENTERS:  

Nicole Belolan, PhD, Rutgers-Camden and National Council on Public History  

Trish Maunder, Creative Director and Co-founder, Philly Touch Tours  

Katherine Allen, Program Director, Philly Touch Tours  

Meredith Sellers, Arts and Accessibility Program Coordinator, The College of Physicians of Philadelphia  

 

2:30 pm to 3:45 pm:  

S-3 | New Jersey’s Rehabilitation Subcode: If it Doesn’t Tell You to Do it, You Don’t Have to  

Credits/Audience: AIA, AICP  

 

New Jersey’s Rehabilitation Subcode, a creative, award-winning document , was adopted in 1998 to address the yawning gap in the Building Code’s approach to existing and historic buildings.  For the first time architects, engineers, code officials and building owners were able to work with a document which specifically addressed the existing conditions and challenges of old buildings.  In the early years the Department of Community Affairs staff gave workshops around the state to inform and engage the community about the New Subcode.  Often in response to questions about whether something was or wasn’t required  the speaker responded by saying  that the Rehabilitation Subcode was a prescriptive document and “ if it doesn’t tell you to do it you don’t have to.”

 

In this session we will provide a summary of the Subcode’s components including its definition of the types of work – repair, renovation, alteration, reconstruction, change of use, and additions; basic and supplementary requirements for Use Groups and the assessment of relative hazard categories when considering Change of Use. We will present examples of typical and some less typical challenges when considering work in existing  and particularly historic buildings. These will include, among others, what types of new uses are acceptable, standards for means of egress, accommodation of barrier-free requirements, flammability of existing material and fire-ratings of existing walls and ceilings. To conclude we will entertain questions  from session participants and offer guidance to using the Rehabilitation Subcode.     

 

MODERATOR: 

David Abramson, AIA, Principal, CTS Group 

 

PRESENTERS:  

David Abramson, AIA, Principal, CTS Group 

Dennis Kowal, Principal, Dennis Kowal Architects   

Eric Holtermann, AIA, Principal, HMR Architects  

 

Day TwoUnderrepresented Histories   

Thursday, June 10, 2021 

You may register for Day Two only or all three days. Registration is now open!

Entertainment during each break will be provided by the Rutgers University Voorhees Choir.   

 

9:00 am to 9:15 am:  

Welcoming Remarks  

by Tahesha Way, New Jersey Secretary of State

 

9:15 am to 10:30 am: 

Panel Discussion  

with Melanie Adams, Director of the Anacostia Community Museum in Washington, DC, and Andrea Roberts, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning and an Associate Director of the Center for Housing & Urban Development at Texas A&M University 

 

10:45 am to 12:00 pm:  

S-4 |Identifying, Investigating, and Memorializing African American Cemeteries in NJ 

Credits/Audience: HT  

 

This session will examine work of the Sankofa Collaborative’s upcoming workshop on African American cemeteries and memorial sites, as well as Timbuctoo Historical Society’s work with the Timbuctoo Cemetery.   

 

MODERATOR: 

Linda Caldwell Epps, PhD, 1804 Consultants   

 

PRESENTERS:  

Beverly Mills, Principal, Friday Truehart Consulting   

Sharon Elaine Buck, Principal, Friday Truehart Consulting 

Guy Weston, President, Timbuctoo Historical Society 

 

12:00 pm to 1:00 pm: 

Lunch  

 

1:00 pm to 2:15 pm:  

S-5 | The William Trent House and Dey Mansion: Case Studies in Expanding Interpretation for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at New Jersey Historic Sites   

Credits/Audience: HT, NP 

 

This session will be a broad discussion about how both sites have adapted long established narratives focused on white men, and expanded interpretation and programming to include stories of Black, indigenous, and female individuals and communities.  

 

MODERATOR: 

Linda Caldwell Epps, PhD, 1804 Consultants   

 

PRESENTERS:  

Princess Hoagland, President, Trent House Association 

Samuel A. Stephens, Treasurer, Trent House Association 

Jessica Bush, Museum Curator, Passaic County Department of Cultural & Historic Affairs 

Lavada Nahon, Interpreter of African American History, NYS OPRHP 

Kelly C. RuffelDirector, Passaic County Department of Cultural & Historic Affairs 

 

2:30 pm to 3:45 pm:  

S-6 | Commemorating Historic Anniversaries in New Jersey: Planning Ahead to Tell a Fuller Story    

Credits/Audience: HT, NP 

 

Many New Jersey state agencies and cultural organizations are in the process of considering, planning or implementing major anniversary-inspired projects. This panel will address the challenges and successes surrounding commemoration planning in New Jersey’s history community. Panelists will then explore how to interpret for a public audience the multifaceted history and lesser-known stories behind many anniversaries, focusing on efforts to make the past relevant, building partnerships, funding strategies, and audience and program development. 

 

MODERATOR: 

Greer A. Luce, Chief Communications Officer, New Jersey Historical Commission  

 

PRESENTERS:    

Allison Titman, Executive Director, Alice Paul Institute 

Sara R. Cureton, Executive Director, New Jersey Historical Commission  

Noelle Lorraine Williams, Curator and Researcher, Radical Women: Fighting for Power and the Vote in New Jersey! 

 

Day Three – Climate Change and Sustainability    

Thursday, June 17, 2021 

You may register for Day Three only or all three days. Registration is now open!

Entertainment during each break will be provided by the Rutgers University Voorhees Choir.   

 

9:00 am to 9:15 am:  

Welcoming Remarks  

by Dorothy P. Guzzo, Executive Director, New Jersey Historic Trust 

 

9:15 am to 10:30 am: 

Keynote Speakers 

Jeanne Herb, Co-Director, and Anthony J. Broccoli, Distinguished Professor, New Jersey Climate Change Resource Center at Rutgers University

 

New Jersey is already feeling the impacts of climate change including increasing temperatures, rising sea levels, and more frequent heavy rains. New Jersey has seen the evidence of climate change in our increasingly mild winters, flooding along inland streams and rivers, and more “sunny day” tidal flooding along areas of the coast. These events can threaten public health and safety, damage public and private properties, undermine critical infrastructure, and harm New Jersey’s economy. Over the past several years, greater attention is being paid to the causes and impacts of climate change in New Jersey and state and local decision-makers are assessing vulnerabilities of changing climate conditions on people, communities and assets throughout the state. As part of this presentation, Rutgers University Distinguished Professor Anthony Broccoli will include an overview of the latest science regarding climate change trends and projections for New Jersey. Following Dr. Broccoli’s presentation, Jeanne Herb of the Rutgers Bloustein School, who co-directs the New Jersey Climate Change Resource Center, will provide insights on implications of changing climate conditions on historic and cultural resources and communities in New Jersey. This second discussion will focus on identifying opportunities to “look to the future to protect the past,” and will set the stage for discussion among conference participants during the rest of the day.

10:45 am to 12:00 pm:  

S-7 | Historic Resources and Flooding 101  

Credits/Audience: HPC, AICP  

 

Historic communities, often developed near waterways, are particularly vulnerable to flooding. Whether located near a tidal or riverine shoreline, structures in villages, towns, and cities face the impact of flooding caused by rising seas, land subsidence, coastal storms, flash flooding, riverine flooding, and stormwater runoff. This session is based on the information contained in the New Jersey Guide and will focus on three distinct pieces to communicate how preservation planners can become involved in protecting their historic places from flooding.  

 

MODERATOR: 

Janet Foster, Board of Trustee, New Jersey Historic Trust   

 

PRESENTERS:  

Dominique M. Hawkins, FAIA, Preservation Design Partnership, LLC     

Jennifer Wellock, National Park Service 

 

12:00 pm to 1:00 pm: 

Lunch  

 

1:00 pm to 2:15 pm:  

S-8 | Flood-Risk Reduction: Three Case Studies   

Credits/Audience: AICP 

 

Wet-floodproofing a suburban home, dry-floodproofing a historic civic building and adapting blocks of connected nineteenth century urban waterfront buildings will be the focus of three case studies.  The case studies build upon the presentations by Dominique Hawkins and Jennifer Wellock in the prior session, Session S-7.  They also illustrate the challenges that Matthew Pisarski, Barton Ross, and Edward Mahaney discuss in the following session, S-9.  Attendees will learn techniques for protecting buildings from riverine flooding, coastal storm surge, heavy rain-event flooding, and rising damp.  

 

MODERATOR: 

Allen Kratz, Principal, Resilience Works, LLC    

 

PRESENTERS:  

Lauren Schiszik, Baltimore City Department of Planning  

Maximillian J. Hayden III, RA, Maximillian Hayden Architect, Inc.  

Ana Sanchez, AIA, Ana Sanchez Architects, former chair, Hoboken Preservation Commission  

 

2:30 pm to 3:45 pm:  

S-9 | Flood-Risk Reduction: Historic Districts on the Water  

Credits/Audience: AICP 

 

Historic Communities on barrier islands and on the shore often exhibit some of the best and most pristine architecture of the nineteenth century. The gingerbread, scalloped shingles, and filigrees of the residential, ecclesiastical, and commercial structures in these communities are under constant threat from storms, salt-spray, sand, and some of the highest rental ratios in the state. Oftentimes, income rental interests are in opposition to thoughtful rehabilitation – plastic lasts longer than wood – but tourism to these communities is also fostered by their quaint historic architecture and streetscapes. How does a community include all interests in the guidelines and standards set for a historic community? The session speakers have been working recently in the field of historic preservation in shore communities. 

 

MODERATOR: 

Janet Foster, Board of Trustees, New Jersey Historic Trust  

 

PRESENTERS:  

Matthew E. Pisarski, AICP, PP. County of Cumberland   

Barton Ross, AIA, AICP, LEED, Barton Ross & Associates, LLC  

Dr. Edward J. Mahaney, Former Mayor, Cape May City