Day two

Click on each "Key" to sort Sessions by Audience
  • Key Audience
  • AIAArchitects
  • AICPPlanners
  • ASLALandscape Architects
  • ARArchaeologists
  • HHistorians
  • HPCHistoric Preservation Commission Members
  • NPNon-Profit Heritage Sites and Museums
  • M/CMunicipal and County Officials

AIA, AICP, and ASLA Continuing Education Credits have been APPROVED.

Click HERE for a PDF of approved sessions. Use the audience key above to sort sessions by track.

A printable conference agenda is available HERE

Day Two Program:
Thursday, June 9, 2016

You may register for Day Two only or combine it with
Day One events. Some Day Two tours and workshops require
a $5 reservation fee. Program details below. Register HERE.
Click a time slot for complete list of sessions.

08:00 am to 09:00 am:

Registration & Breakfast

  • Location:
  • Jubilee Hall Lobby

09:00 am to 10:15 am:

Opening Plenary: “Demystifying Advocacy”

  • Location:
  • Jubilee Hall Auditorium

Audience: AIA AICP AR H HPC NP M/C

Historic preservationists in New Jersey are passionate about their work and have been successful in protecting New Jersey’s treasured places and working to preserve open space, but achieving lasting results requires working at the policy level. Advocacy is a means to an end that achieves lasting impact and is necessary for the voices of preservationists to be heard. Yet, there is a tendency to marginalize and undervalue advocacy in the nonprofit sector, and in particular this is prevalent among history nonprofits who view advocacy as the purview of others for a multitude of reasons, including misunderstanding, fear and impatience.

In this engaging keynote, Laurel will share her passion for a subject she practiced for over a decade, reframing advocacy from a strategy that is feared and marginalized to one embraced for doing the most good. Key barriers to higher levels of sustained nonprofit participation in advocacy will be identified and explored. Storytelling and case studies will serve as key devices for demonstrating the catalyzing affect that advocacy has in strengthening organizations and serving as a leadership strategy.

Audience members will leave feeling motivated, with a solid grounding of how advocacy can help advance their mission critical work as well as fit into the larger network of those volunteers and professionals who work to save New Jersey’s history.

Presenters:

  • Laurel O’Sullivan , JD

10:30 am to 02:30 pm:

Stories Worth Telling: Documenting Our Preservation Efforts

  • Location:
  • Jubilee Hall Room 132

Do you have a story to tell about your first local preservation experience or a particular historic building you fell in love with? The Stories Worth Telling project will document your memories of meaningful historic preservation experiences in a video-taped interview. Most of us who consider ourselves “preservationists” can readily recall some of the inspirational people, buildings and crises that pulled us into the world of historic preservation, and that continue to motivate our advocacy on behalf of New Jersey’s historic places. With this year’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act, we feel it is a particularly appropriate time to look back on our own history of preservation in New Jersey.

There will be only 12 time slots available for oral history interviews between 10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. If you are interested in participating in this project, please reserve a spot when you register. If we do not fill all the openings before the conference, there may be some spaces still available that day – check at the registration table on the day of the conference.

Facilitators:

  • Howard Green

  • Deborah Kelly

10:45 a.m. to Noon
Choice of Educational Sessions

S-1 | Advocacy and You

  • Location:
  • Stafford Hall Room 06

Audience: AICP NP

Time: 10:45 am 12:00 pm

Following her plenary remarks, keynote speaker Laurel O’Sullivan will lead a session for nonprofit staff and board members on the importance of incorporating advocacy into the organization’s mission. Most nonprofits do not see themselves as critical to a larger network. Yet, growth and success are dependent on the strength of that network. This session will define advocacy and demonstrate how to integrate advocacy efforts into the organization’s overall mission and core programs. An active question and answer period and group discussion will be facilitated that incorporates New Jersey’s advocacy needs into the discussion.

Moderator:

  • Lisa Ginther

Presenters:

  • Laurel O’Sullivan , JD

S-2 | Yes you CAN: Access Issues in Historic Cultural Facilities

  • Location:
  • Science & Technology, Lerner Amphitheater

Audience: AIA NP M/C

Time: 10:45 am 12:00 am

In 1992, the New Jersey Theatre Alliance (NJTA) established a partnership with the New Jersey State Council on the Arts to design and implement a project called the Cultural Access Network, or CAN, that educates and supports the cultural community in their access work. This session will present the unique partnership between the NJTA and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, the CAN’s advocacy, education, and volunteer efforts. Highlights will include the role of an access advisory committee, the importance of a self-assessment survey, the design and implementation of an ADA long-range plan, innovative programs and marketing strategies, and steps you can take to enhance facility access to your historic cultural institution for seniors and people with disabilities.

Moderator:

  • Michael R. Schnoering , FAIA

Presenters:

  • Susan P. Coen

  • John McEwen

S-3 | Rightsizing Legacy Cities: An Action Agenda

  • Location:
  • Nursing Building, Classroom 101

Audience: AIA AICP ASLA H HPC NP M/C

Time: 10:45 am 12:00 pm

This Activity is Sponsored by: Wu & Associates

Medium-sized metropolitan areas struggling with business decline and population loss (called “legacy cities”) are facing unprecedented challenges including disinvestment, abandonment, demolition by neglect, and extraordinarily limited resources. Yet they also offer affordable communities of irreplaceable urban character in which historic preservation has a vital role to play in their revitalization. In this session, participants will learn a newly defined agenda to help preservation become a positive force for managing change, informing planning, and driving reinvestment. The discussion will include case studies and the outcome from a Legacy City Preservation event in Newark.

Presenters:

  • Emilie Evans

  • Nicholas Hamilton

  • Cristina Garmendia

S-4 | Above and Beyond the Monthly Meeting: How Historic Preservation Commissions Affect Outreach and Education

  • Location:
  • Jubilee Hall Auditorium

Audience: AICP HPC

Time: 10:45 am 12:00 pm

One of the responsibilities of a historic preservation commission (HPC) is to provide continuing education for citizens regarding historic preservation issues and concerns. However, many local commissions find that much of their time and effort is focused on their regulatory responsibilities, at the expense of additional educational programs and outreach activities. The local HPCs represented in this session have done a remarkable job of balancing regulatory reviews with innovative and effective outreach tools in their communities, teaching local preservationists how to be their own best advocates.

Moderator:

  • Jonathan Kinney

Presenters:

  • William H. Michelson , Esq.

  • Gianfranco Archimede , MS, RPA

  • Patty Chrisman

S-5 | National Park Service at 100: Scholarship, Education and Tradition

  • Location:
  • Nursing Building, Amphitheater

Audience: ASLA H HPC NP M/C

Time: 10:45 am 12:00 pm

With its centennial in 2016, the National Park Service (NPS) is struggling to find the balance between scholarship and what the public wants. This panel will explore the value of history as presented by the NPS, the challenges of straightforward historical narrative, the history of the NPS in the history and historic preservation field, the methodology of current and evolving practices, and the realization that the understanding and appreciation of history by the public has shifted dramatically. Shared experiences will include how to develop innovative and award-winning education programs; research and writing challenges; and public presentations. Panelists will engage with attendees as well through quick quizzes and trivia challenges. Door prizes will be available!

Presenters:

  • Dr. Jude Pfister

  • Sarah E. Minegar , Ph.D.

  • Leonard DeGraaf

S-6 | 50 Years of Section 106 Review: The Re-Visioning of New Jersey’s Past

  • Location:
  • Stafford Hall Room 110

Audience: AIA AICP ASLA AR H M/C

Time: 10:45 am 12:00 pm

This session commemorates the 50th anniversary of the 1966 National Historic Preservation Act by highlighting the role of Section 106, which requires federal agencies to take into account the effect of their actions on historic properties on or eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. This provision has resulted in a tremendous increase in information on many aspects of New Jersey’s past and the cultural resources that tell its story. Using a range of contextualized case studies, an expert panel will engagingly highlight the major Section 106 projects which have significantly added to our knowledge of New Jersey’s past.

Moderator and Presenter:

  • Ian Burrow , RPA, FSA

Presenters:

  • Richard W. Hunter , Ph.D., RPA

  • R. Michael Stewart , Ph.D., RPA

  • Rebecca Yamin , Ph.D., RPA

012:00 pm to 02:00 pm:

Lunch – Marketplace Exhibits – Poster Competition

  • Location:
  • University Center

 

Lunch, The Marketplace, and the Poster Competition will all take place from Noon – 2:00 pm in the University Center (building 12 on the campus map).

 

The Marketplace is always a fun mix of vendors and this year is no exception. We welcome authors, small businesses, preservation consultants, and state and non-profit organizations. Main Street NJ will be back again with NJ 350 gear – steeply discounted! Be sure to bring cash or checks if you intend to make purchases.
 
View the full list of vendors HERE.

 

Also on exhibit this year will be 12 posters on topics ranging from Thomas Edison to the Meadowlands to Historic Districts. A panel of judges including Dr. Richard Veit, Star Ledger columnist Mark DiIonno, and Cristen Piatnotchka of the NJ Historical Commission will evaluate the posters and announce a winner during lunch. Participants will be on-hand to discuss their fascinating projects. Stop by to show your support for the next generation of history enthusiasts!
 
View the full list of posters HERE.

1:30 to 4:45 p.m.
Choice of Afternoon Field Workshops

W-1 | Maplewood, NJ: Portrait of a Quintessential American Railroad Suburb (bus and walking tour)

  • Location:
  • Bus leaves outside student center

Audience: HPC

Time: 01:30 pm 04:45 pm

This field workshop will explore the development of Maplewood as a 1920s and 30s railroad suburb that features intact, walkable neighborhoods, varied historical revival architecture, and extant 18th and 19th century homes that fit seamlessly into the picturesque streetscapes. Tour participants will visit the National Register listed Maplewood Municipal Building (1930-32) and see the series of murals that capture the history of the town, walk through Memorial Park, a 25 acre park designed in the 1920s by the firms of Brinley & Holbrook and the Olmsted Brothers, and discuss additional municipal planning exercises. Both the downtown area and several residential neighborhoods will be featured.

Note: This is a bus and walking tour. Dress for the weather and wear appropriate footwear.

Tour Leaders:

  • Ginny Kurshan

  • Gary Nelson

W-2 | The Village of South Orange & the Montrose Park Historic District: From the Lenape Trail to the International Style

  • Location:
  • Bus leaves outside student center

Audience: H HPC NP

Time: 01:30 pm 04:45 pm

For nearly 150 years, South Orange’s landscape, proximity to major cities, and reliable train line has promoted growth and development and provided a haven from city life. Early developers purchased land in the area now known as Montrose Park and created deed-restricted estates. Many of these late Victorian and period revival style homes remain today, surrounded by tree-lined streets, slate sidewalks, and period gaslights. Examples of every common Mid-Atlantic style of architecture since the late 19th century are represented. Following a brief presentation overview, the tour will introduce the architecture and neighborhoods of South Orange with particular emphasis on Montrose Park.

Tour Leaders:

  • Amy Dahn

  • Maureen Gammon

  • Karen Marlowe

  • Naoma Welk

2:00 to 3:15 p.m.
Choice of Educational Sessions

S-7 | Will You Help Save This Place?

  • Location:
  • Nursing Building, Classroom 101

Audience: H HPC NP M/C

Time: 02:00 pm 03:15 pm

This Activity is Sponsored by: Clarke Caton Hintz

How can marketing, advocacy and community outreach complement and expand on traditional historic preservation tactics? Staff from the National Trust for Historic Preservation will share successful examples of their work engaging local preservationists at more than 60 buildings and landscapes throughout the country as part of the National Treasures program, a portfolio of more than 60 sites that are threatened and face an uncertain future. Staff will also present the revived #ThisPlaceMatters campaign and share best practices.

Presenters:

  • Sarah M. Heffern

  • Julia Rocchi

S-8 | Focus on Photography: Taking Photos that Improve Your Nominations, Surveys and Reviews

  • Location:
  • Jubilee Hall Auditorium

Audience: AIA AR H HPC NP

Time: 02:00 pm 03:15 pm

This session draws on the National Park Service’s new guidance by presenting best practices and giving examples of good and bad photographs. In addition, a professional commercial photographer will teach attendees how to take publication-worthy photographs for a variety of preservation purposes, including National Register nominations, architectural surveys, and regulatory reviews. In an increasingly digital age that tends to value image over text, photographs that can present reality and tell a story are vital to the field of historic preservation. The goal of the session is to increase the quality of photographs that are used in preservation practice, thus increasingly the visibility of historic resources and the work of preservationists.

Presenters:

  • Kat Cannelongo

  • Douglas McVarish

  • William “Billy” Neumann

  • Sarah Scott

S-9 | Unearthing the Future along I-280 in Orange: Reverse Archaeology through Art and Oral Histories

  • Location:
  • Science & Technology, Lerner Amphitheater

Audience: AIA AICP AR H NP

Time: 02:00 pm 03:15 pm

This Activity is Sponsored by: RGA, Inc.

This session explores ongoing efforts to document, interpret, and challenge the impact of the construction of Interstate-280 in Orange in the late 1960s. The roadway cut a path through the heart of the city, devastating the city’s historic African American and Italian American communities. This is one of many examples in U.S. cities where highways disrupted and displaced vibrant communities. This case study includes oral history, ethnography, and arts interventions to understand the impacts of I-280, to learn more about the communities before its construction, and envision how current residents can revitalize Orange’s future.

Moderator:

  • Candace Gabbard

Presenters:

  • Mindy Thompson Fullilove , MD

  • Michael Malbrough

  • Christopher N. Matthews , Ph.D.

  • Katherine T. McCaffrey

S-10 | How New Jersey’s National Parks Are Engaging Visitors in New Ways

  • Location:
  • Nursing Building, Amphitheater

Audience: HPC NP M/C

Time: 02:00 pm 03:15 pm

New Jersey’s National Parks are incorporating new technologies to reach out to new and youthful audiences. The state’s historic sites and museums have much to learn from the national efforts:

● Thomas Edison National Historical Park’s use of Skype and Periscope to connect with virtual visitors/student

● Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park showcases food, art, music, and literature from the local communities as part of their “Taste of Paterson” program

● Statue of Liberty National Monument and Ellis Island utilize the virtual/social media connection for telling stories related to areas of the park that are not accessible to the public

Moderator and Presenter:

  • Vanessa Smiley

Presenters:

  • Darren Boch

  • John Hnedak

S-11 | Effective Marketing for Heritage Tourism

  • Location:
  • Stafford Hall Room 110

Audience: HPC NP

Time: 02:00 pm 03:15 pm

Individual sites that don’t have access to funding for marketing advice often learn on the go, depending on the skills of their limited staff or volunteers. Yet effective marketing of a heritage site to potential and returning visitors is key in determining the operating budget, staff and volunteers assignments, financial development and stewardship. This session will present marketing techniques from a variety of perspectives – a regional destination marketing organization, a visitor-ready heritage site that is carrying out its visitor and marketing strategies, and a marketing professional who can provide an outline of strategies that can be cost effective for any sized organization.

Moderator and Presenter:

  • Vonda Givens

  • Jennifer Costa

S-12 | Crowdfunding for History and Historic Preservation (Where are those Crowds and What will they Fund?)

  • Location:
  • Stafford Hall Room 06

Audience: HPC NP M/C

Time: 02:00 pm 03:15 pm

This Activity is Sponsored by: Eclectic Architecture, LLC

Crowdfunding is an emerging new way to raise money, and one that many nonprofits believe will be the answer to their fundraising prayers. It generally involves raising small amounts of money from a large number of donors, usually via the Internet. Unfortunately, crowdfunding is complex and can be time-consuming. This session will provide an overview of crowdfunding, share case examples of success in the history and historic preservation fields, and suggest ways to incorporate crowdfunding into an overall fundraising plan. Participants may also share their experiences with this new fundraising strategy.

Moderator:

  • Evelyn C. Murphy , Ph.D.

Presenters:

  • Samip Mallick

  • Geri Stengel

3:30 to 4:45 p.m.
Choice of Educational Sessions

S-13 | Learning from Loss: Strategies for Saving Endangered Sites

  • Location:
  • Nursing Building, Classroom 101

Audience: HPC NP

Time: 03:30 pm 04:45 pm

This Activity is Sponsored by: Preservation New Jersey

In recent years, New Jersey has suffered its share of high-profile battles for the preservation of critical landmarks. In 2015, Greystone Psychiatric Hospital was demolished. The Duke Mansion (at press time) is threatened with destruction. Hinchcliffe Stadium, after years of advocacy, public education, negotiation and fundraising, may be on the road to restoration. Each year Preservation New Jersey publishes a list of the state’s ten most endangered historic sites and updates the status of those landmarks lost, saved or still in limbo. This session will explore some of the common challenges and strategies that property advocates have in communicating a site’s significance, creating a supportive community and negotiating the route to saving a historic building or site.

Moderator:

  • Margaret Hickey , RA

Presenters:

  • Brian Lo Pinto

  • Sally Woodruff Garrison

  • Peggy Van Patton

S-14 | Beyond the Tape Measure: Documenting Historic Properties in the 21st Century

  • Location:
  • Science & Technology, Lerner Amphitheater

Audience: AIA HPC

Time: 03:30 pm 04:45 pm

This Activity is Sponsored by: Historic Building Architects, LLC

Effectively and efficiently gathering information about existing building conditions will result in clearer direction to the Project Team, Contractors, and Owners as well as lead to more accurate scopes of work and cost estimates. While the technology may be pricier, the cost benefit analysis is worth a look. This session will present the use of 3D laser technology and drone (quadcopter) technology as utilized in the field. Attendees will come away with an understanding of the technologies and how they may be applicable for many projects.

Moderator:

  • Jennifer Stark , AIA, CSBA

Presenters:

  • Annabelle Radcliffe-Trenner

  • Kevin Hanna

S-15 | Planning for Heritage Tourism

  • Location:
  • Stafford Hall Room 110

Audience: AICP HPC NP

Time: 03:30 pm 04:45 pm

The success of heritage tourism depends upon how ready you are to welcome visitors. Creating a destination for heritage travelers requires not only building popularity for a significant place but almost as importantly on building infrastructure that can comfortably accommodate visitors. This session highlights the methods, strategies and planning tools for building and managing heritage tourism within the community looking at examples from Charleston, South Carolina and the Garden State.

Moderator and Presenter:

  • Dorothy P. Guzzo

Presenters:

  • Michael Lysicatos , AICP/PP

  • Amy Southerland , AICP

S-16 | Restoring and Adapting Cultural Landscapes

  • Location:
  • Nursing Building, Amphitheater

Credits: ASLA HPC NP M/C

Time: 03:30 pm 04:45 pm

Landscapes are ever-changing so it’s a challenge to maintain and preserve a landscape to a certain time period and condition. Balancing the effort between restoring a landscape, and creating a welcoming environment for community use may also affect how the site is treated. This session will present two high-profile landscapes:

• The grounds of Thomas Edison’s home, Glenmont, are under restoration based on recommendations of its 2010 Cultural Landscape Report to restore the landscape to its 1931 appearance. Student programs work in partnership with the National Park Service to accomplish some of these treatment recommendations.

• After landscape restoration and a grand reopening, Reeves-Reed Arboretum has greatly increased its visitation. The current challenge is to maintain the historic legacy of the site and buildings while acknowledging the needs, safety, and opportunities of a united green vision that will continue to be environmentally responsible and captivate the public.

Moderator:

  • Michelle Mihalkovitz

Presenters:

  • Matthew Jacobs

  • Frank Juliano

  • Amy Trimarco

S-17 | Deaccessioning 101

  • Location:
  • Stafford Hall Room 06

Audience: NP

Time: 03:30 pm 04:45 pm

When museums, historic houses, and historic sites find their storage area overflowing or discover items in their collections that no longer have relevance to their mission, what should they do? Deaccessioning is the process of officially removing an object from a permanent collection and while it is considered an accepted part of collection management, it also tends to make the headlines. This session will introduce the practice of deaccessioning, highlighting the legal and ethical issues involved, and provide a case study that will show how deaccessioning can be a routine solution to collections management problems and marshal an institution’s resources for the long-term preservation of its permanent collection.

Moderator and Presenter:

  • Briann G. Greenfield , Ph.D.

Presenters:

  • Heather Hope Kuruvilla , MA, JD

  • Sally Yerkovich

05:00 pm to 06:30 pm:

Closing Reception

  • Location:
  • Jubilee Hall Atrium, 4th Floor

Carpe Duo
 
The closing reception will feature musical group Carpe Duo of Montclair. Musicians Claire Tsiporukha and Christopher Zak will perform both Jazz and Classical sets.